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Links tagged with “lrb”

  1. Jackson Lears reviews ‘The Age of Acquiescence’ by Steve Fraser · LRB 16 July 2015

    How left-leaning beliefs have disappeared in the US, mostly over the first half of the 20th century. (Subscribers only)

  2. James Meek · Why are you still here?: Who owns Grimsby? · LRB 23 April 2015

    A long, good piece from Grimsby on its history, its industries and its general election candidates. Lots of things relevant to the rest of the country too of course.

  3. James Meek · The Shock of the Pretty: Seventy Hours with Don Draper · LRB 9 April 2015

    Good on ‘Mad Men’. A bunch of these criticisms are why I’ve failed to make it through the first season twice.

  4. Frances Stonor Saunders · Stuck on the Flypaper: The Hobsbawm File · LRB 9 April 2015

    Fascinating. For the spycraft, the jargon, the very quiet British hysteria over communism, MI5, the weird changing attitudes to the various factions before and after WWII, the BBC. Scarily bonkers.

  5. Adam Shatz reviews ‘Congo’ by David Van Reybrouck · LRB 23 October 2014

    This stopped me… After a long account of decades of central African bloodshed, “the profits from ‘conflict minerals’ peaked [in 2000], fed by increased demand for mobile phones and the release of the Sony PlayStation 2.”David Van Reybrouck

  6. Francis FitzGibbon · Short Cuts · LRB 23 October 2014

    Interesting about exactly how much or little the Human Rights Act, which the Tories want to repeal, constrains the British government.

  7. Owen Hatherley reviews ‘Guide to the Architecture of London’ by Edward Jones and Christopher Woodward · LRB 21 August 2014

    I’m not sure this makes me want to read the book under review, but the review itself is a good read if you’re into London and/or architecture.

  8. Perry Anderson · The Italian Disaster · LRB 22 May 2014

    Not for most of the article, but for the first 7+ paragraphs outlining the, er, legal difficulties, of those in political power across Europe. We are terrible.

  9. Andrew O’Hagan · Ghosting: Julian Assange · LRB 6 March 2014

    This very long piece about failing to ghost-write Julian Assange’s biography is as good as everyone said it was.

  10. Where will we live? by James Meek (LRB)

    Linked to by everyone, for good reason. A good, long piece about the UK’s history of council and social housing, the architecture and planning, and where we are now. As with so many policy areas, I wish one of the main parties wanted to do something bold, different and good.

  11. Diary by Peter Pomerantsev (London Review of Books)

    Starts as a fascinating brief description of sistema, the pervasive Russian corruption, ends up starting to show how London is now a place where this is legitimised. Laundering crookedness.

  12. Diary by Lynn Visson (London Review of Books)

    A shortish piece on being an interpreter at the UN.

  13. Success by Benjamin Markovits (London Review of Books)

    I’m not into sport but love articles like this, which ponders why England/GB has been successful in recent years at some sports. Business, statistics, culture, etc.

  14. The Logic of Nuremberg by Mahmood Mamdani (London Review of Books)

    On the differences between the Nuremberg Trials and the Convention for a Democratic South Africa, and how they compare to the International Criminal Court. Which isn’t really selling it, but I hadn’t thought about these fundamental differences. (Subscribers only)

  15. Sold Out by Stefan Collini (London Review of Books)

    On how the UK’s universities have changed over recent decades, becoming bigger, more beholden to private interests, more expensive for students… the LRB’s best current affairs articles are all so depressing.

  16. Counter-Counter-Revolution by David Runciman (London Review of Books)

    On whether 1979 was the most significant year of the 20th century. Either way, an interesting look at a handful of people and occasions that had a profound effect. Suggests we don’t know yet who our current era’s most impactful people will be.

  17. Forms of Delirium by Peter Pomerantsev (London Review of Books)

    Russia’s an odd place. Nationalist, Christian biker gangs etc.

  18. Richard J. Evans reviews ‘The People’s Car’ by Bernhard Rieger · LRB 12 September 2013

    Lots of interesting nuggets in this history of the Volkswagen Beetle. (Subscribers only)

  19. Ian Penman reviews ‘Mod’ by Richard Weight · LRB 29 August 2013

    This is packed with good stuff. The differences between the fans of trad and modern jazz. Mods as continental modernists, aesthetes. Mods compared to other subcultures. “Tellyology”: shaping history with both eyes on a potential TV series. Ray Davies. Miles Davis. Blur. Noel Gallagaher. Today’s Mod revival as a ploddy “dad rock” conservatism. The British Music Experience.

  20. Jonathan Coe reviews ‘The Wit and Wisdom of Boris Johnson’ edited by Harry Mount · LRB 18 July 2013

    Very good on the futility, even dangerousness, of political satire and dismissing politicians as corrupt buffoons.

  21. John Lanchester · Are we having fun yet?: The Biggest Scandal of All · LRB 4 July 2013

    This and the second part are so worth a read. Banks are mind-boggling.

  22. Slavoj Žižek · Trouble in Paradise: The Global Protest · LRB 18 July 2013

    “To demand consistency at strategically selected points where the system cannot afford to be consistent is to put pressure on the entire system.”

  23. Malcolm Bull reviews ‘On Global Justice’ by Mathias Risse · LRB 21 February 2013

    I love reading things like this, here about Risse’s Rawls-influenced theories, but also I find them very, very hard to concentrate on. (Subscribers only)

  24. Short Cuts (London Review of Books)

    Paul Myerscough on Pret a Manger. 91% of employees are immigrants. Social security as a subsidy to companies whose products would otherwise be too expensive for their non-social-security-receiving customers.

  25. Let’s Call it Failure (London Review of Books)

    John Lanchester on good, if depressing, form on the state of the UK economy and “austerity”.

  26. Light Entertainment (London Review of Books)

    Andrew O’Hagan on Jimmy Savile etc. Quite good on the general difference in TV and radio culture in the 50s/60s/70s, although it still feels like a very brief skim over the hard-to-grasp era/topic/atmosphere. (A bit late to this, catching up.)

  27. Diary (London Review of Books)

    Lovely article by Emily Witt about online dating in New York and San Franciso. “The mind contains very few truths that the body withholds. There is little of import in an encounter between two bodies that would fail to be revealed rather quickly. Until the bodies are introduced, seduction is only provisional.”

  28. At Hyde Park Corner (London Review of Books)

    Jonathan Meades on fine form, on the newish Bomber Command Memorial. “The failure of British modernism and of today’s synthetic modernism to devise a memorious idiom provides an ample justification for the mongers of easy-viewin’ classicism to dump their stuff indiscriminately.”

  29. James Meek · How We Happened to Sell Off Our Electricity · LRB 13 September 2012

    Plenty of people linked to this at the time, but I forgot. Now I am. A good read on who now owns the UK’s power.

  30. Iain Sinclair · Diary: My Olympics · LRB 30 August 2012

    He’s usually an entertaining read, despite his relentless talking-down of even incidental things (I’m not sure Zara Phillips’ Olympic horse can be described as a “sore-hoofed nag”). But, more and more, I wonder, “What does Iain Sinclair *want*? I know what he’s against, but what is he *for*?”

  31. David Conn · Follow the Money · LRB 30 August 2012

    Not following football — the sport or the business — I enjoyed this article about how the leagues have changed, and the effect of vast sums of money flowing in and out of the clubs.

  32. Collective Joy « LRB blog

    Also on the opening ceremony: “It was love as sentiment, a nostalgic cry for what has been lost. And it is lost. There is no party of the left with a different attitude towards the economy, privatisation and cuts in benefits and the NHS.”

  33. Elif Batuman · Diary: Pamuk’s Museum · LRB 7 June 2012

    I hadn’t heard of this. Orhan Pamuk made a museum of objects belonging to characters from his novel ‘The Museum of Innocence’, which he’d originally intended to be written as a museum catalogue. Now he’s writing the catalogue for this museum.

  34. John Lanchester · Marx at 193 · LRB 5 April 2012

    Just realised I never Pinboarded this at the time, only wrote about it. For completion’s sake.

  35. Jacqueline Rose · A Rumbling of Things Unknown: Marilyn Monroe · LRB 26 April 2012

    I know very little about Monroe but she sounds brilliant, sadness aside. This is a great, long article about how she was always reading and learning and trying to do things the right way.

  36. Mohammed el Gorani and Jérôme Tubiana · Diary: Guantánamo · LRB 15 December 2011

    This month it’s ten years since Guantanamo opened. People are still held there indefinitely. This is one former detainee’s account. Yay America! You must all be so proud.

  37. Michael Neill reviews ‘Medicinal Cannibalism…’ … and ‘Mummies, Cannibals and Vampires’ … · LRB 1 December 2011

    About “mummy”, the processed remains of humans that was considered a valuable medicine as recently as the 19th century. (Subscribers only)

  38. James Meek · It’s already happened: The NHS Goes Private · LRB 22 September 2011

    Long, good, interesting, righteous-anger-inducing article about the ongoing privatisation of the NHS, and how the service compares to other options. I am struggling not to swear.

  39. James Lasdun · Diary: Police procedurals · LRB 8 September 2011

    Really interesting account by a curious writer of using a (US) police department’s Firearms Training Simulator. (Subscribers only)

  40. Stefan Collini · From Robbins to McKinsey: The Dismantling of the Universities · LRB 25 August 2011

    On the higher education White Paper: The gradual movement of responsibility for higher education within government towards business departments; the tortuous attempts to balance a free market and a command economy; the odd language (“the mission-statement present”, “the dogmatic future tense”); that studying something often isn’t wholly enjoyable; that choosing a university “cannot primarily be price-sensitive, adaptive, feedback-governed consumer behaviour”; the 1963 Robbins Report’s emphasis on intellectual inquiry rather than “meeting the needs of employers.”

  41. LRB · Daniel Soar · Short Cuts

    Fascinating, brief, look at the US government’s interest in analysing metaphors in foreign languages for security purposes. Well worth a read if you write, talk or think.

  42. LRB · Howard Hotson · Short Cuts

    The new BPP University in the UK is owned by the Apollo Group, whose biggest US institution, the University of Phoenix, sounds very dodgy.

  43. LRB · Christopher Tayler · Short Cuts

    Mainly for this phrase about the School of Life: “My friend said that it was like watching people marooned on a desert island doing their best to re-create Radio 4.”

  44. LRB · Donald MacKenzie · How to Make Money in Microseconds

    A look at algorithms used in stock market trading, their effects, and including an explanation of why the market fell by 6 per cent in five minutes in May 2010.

  45. LRB · Howard Hotson · Don’t Look to the Ivy League

    A good account of why the US’s market-based university system (admired by Tories) harms the public system and isn’t as good as a first glance at league tables suggests.

  46. LRB · Stephen Sedley · Plimsoll’s Story

    Some interesting bits about the development of laws and reforms in 19th century England.

  47. LRB · Will Self · The Frowniest Spot on Earth

    A critical look at the “breathless,” airport-centered vision of how we’ll live in the future, according to the book ‘Aerotropolis’.

  48. LRB · James Meek · In the Sorting Office

    A long, interesting look at the problems facing the Royal Mail and how the privatised Dutch and German postal services are managing.

  49. LRB · Richard J. Evans · The Wonderfulness of Us

    I’m finding this discussion (the article and many letters below it) about how history should be taught in British schools interesting, although I’ve lost track of exactly who thinks what.

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