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Bookmarks tagged with “lrb”

  1. Chloe Aridjis · At the HKW: Aby Warburg · LRB 5 November 2020

    I hadn’t heard of Warburg’s ‘Bilderatlas Mnemosyne’ before. A “display of almost a thousand images … an attempt to create something like a flowchart of Western civilisation“.

  2. Peter Geoghegan · Cronyism and Clientelism · LRB 5 November 2020

    Depressing piece from November on the UK’s kleptocracy.

  3. Alex Abramovich · Even When It’s a Big Fat Lie: ‘Country Music’ · LRB 8 October 2020

    Good, critical review of Ken Burns’ ‘Country Music’ and the rest.

  4. Andrew O’Hagan · I’m being a singer: Dandy Highwaymen · LRB 8 October 2020

    On the New Romantics. “It turns out that the inheritors of punk were not those little indie bands I loved … Male indie kids were completely conventional, scrubbed boys, who went to the same barbers as their fathers, supported the same football teams, and wore the same aftershave.”

  5. James Lasdun · Bats on the Ceiling: The Gospel of St Karen · LRB 24 September 2020

    This was a good read about a con involving some ancient, supposedly biblical, papyrus.

  6. Ian Penman · Vorsprung durch Techno · LRB 10 September 2020

    I’m always pleased to see an Ian Penman article in the LRB and I liked this ambivalent one about Kraftwerk.

  7. Tom Crewe · A Girl Called Retina: You’ll like it when you get there · LRB 13 August 2020

    The first half of this especially good, full of jolly entertaining anecdotes about mid 20th century girls’ boarding schools.

  8. Amia Srinivasan · He, She, One, They, Ho, Hus, Hum, Ita: How Should I Refer to You? · LRB 2 July 2020

    I had no idea there had been quite so many attempts to come up with gender-neutral pronouns for quite so long.

  9. Andrew O’Hagan · Seventy Years in a Colourful Trade: The Soho Alphabet · LRB 16 July 2020

    I enjoyed this portrait of a Soho despite, or because of, being unfamiliar with that world.

  10. Ange Mlinko · Just a Diphthong Away: Gary Lutz · LRB 7 May 2020

    Lots of great lines quoted from Lutz’s short stories here.

  11. Erin Maglaque · Inclined to Putrefaction: In Quarantine · LRB 9 February 2020

    Published in February, this review of a book about how 17th century Florence coped with the plague now seems very knowing.

  12. Jenny Turner · Who Are They?: The Institute of Ideas · LRB 8 July 2010

    Nine years ago: “One day, the conditions would be right and they [the RCP/LM/IoI crowd] would be ready: public-sector cuts, rising unemployment, the collapsing Euro, a Tory government, more or less.” (Subscribers only)

  13. How bad can it get? (London Review of Books)

    Good, but not much hope about UK politics. But I learned an excellent word: “rhodomontade”, extravagant boasting. Word of the year.

  14. Francis Gooding reviews ‘The Uninhabitable Earth’ by David Wallace-Wells · LRB 1 August 2019

    On the plus side, I’ll be dead by 2100. I suspect my 80s+ won’t be great though. Sometimes I wonder why young people and folks with kids aren’t demonstrating *all the time*. (No, I know why.)

  15. John Lanchester · Good New Idea: Universal Basic Income · LRB 18 July 2019

    Seems like a decent overview of the options, nicely written as ever.

  16. Patricia Lockwood · The Communal Mind: The Internet and Me · LRB 21 February 2019

    A lovely piece about what it’s like to be online, “in the portal”, these days.

  17. Alice Spawls · On the Sofa: ‘Killing Eve’ · LRB 8 November 2018

    The show wasn’t perfect, but this is good on what was good about it.

  18. Eliot Weinberger · Ten Typical Days in Trump’s America · LRB 25 October 2018

    If you want to be thankful that our mess is only the size of Brexit, this might help? (Sorry America)

  19. James Meek · Brexit and Myths of Englishness: For England and St George · LRB 11 October 2018

    Good on stuff about Brexit, around the politics: beliefs, myths, personal hypocrisies.

  20. Tom Crewe reviews ‘How to Survive a Plague’ … · LRB 27 September 2018

    If you were too young, straight, insulated or ignorant to fully grasp what Aids meant and means, this is a long and sobering read.

  21. Bee Wilson reviews ‘The Littlehampton Libels’ by Christopher Hilliard · LRB 8 February 2018

    A lovely article about a woman writing very sweary anonymous letters to her neighbours in Littlehampton in the 1920s.

  22. The Playboy of West 29th Street (London Review of Books)

    Colm Tóibín on John Butler Yeats. For the unrequited, long-distance love in old age and the perpetually almost-but-never finished artwork. (Subscribers only)

  23. George Duoblys · One, Two, Three, Eyes on Me! · LRB 5 October 2017

    On the “efficient” teaching and disciplinary methods used in some London secondary schools. Sounds grim.

  24. Merely an Empire - London Review of Books

    Good on Ken Burns’ ‘The Vietnam War’. “We cannot make a movie that will save us.”

  25. James Wolcott reviews ‘Making It’ by Norman Podhoretz · LRB 18 May 2017

    A very fun, lively-written read, even though most of the people mentioned mean little to me. Reminded me of reading The Modern Review, how I enjoyed it without understanding so many of the references.

  26. Tom Crewe · What will be left?: Labour’s Prospects · LRB 18 May 2017

    Slightly out of date opinion poll-wise, but I liked this as a summary of where Labour is and how we, as a country, got here.

  27. The Last London - London Review of Books

    I usually find Iain Sinclair a bit much, too grouchy, but the start of this is very good on modern London, around Shoreditch, Spitalfields and Liverpool Street.

  28. The Strange Death of Municipal England (London Review of Books)

    A good read, especially if you’re feeling all full of optimism about a new year and need to be brought crashing back to earth.

  29. Snob Cuts (London Review of Books)

    A fun, brief piece about snobbery and class.

  30. They Could Have Picked… (London Review of Books)

    Eliot Weinberger on all the Republican presidential candidates other than Trump. At this point it’s become easy to forget that they were *all* nutjobs. Still, makes me thankful to live in the UK.

  31. The Satoshi Affair (London Review of Books)

    An entertaining long read by Andrew O’Hagan about Craig Wright proving that he’s Satoshi Nakamoto.

  32. Nigel’s Against the World (London Review of Books)

    I’ve mostly been ignoring EU referendum stuff but this is quite good on the things we don’t really know about what happens if we leave.

  33. Stefan Collini · Who are the spongers now? · LRB 21 January 2016

    It’s probably only because I’m not involved in higher education, and don’t have children heading towards it, that I find reading things like this, about the government’s current and future plans, enjoyable, like dystopian fiction.

  34. Corbyn in the Media - Paul Myerscough (London Review of Books)

    This is good on the Guardian being out of touch, in denial, with all those who voted for Corbyn, and on the “impartiality” of the BBC.

  35. Rosemary Hill reviews ‘Princes at War’ by Deborah Cadbury · LRB 30 July 2015

    The Duke of Windsor, who’s always used on classic menswear forums as the ultimate in style… a bit of a dick.

  36. Steven Mithen reviews ‘Earth’s Deep History’ by Martin Rudwick · LRB 30 July 2015

    On the history of how we’ve explained the history of Earth and life on it. (Also subscribers only)

  37. Colin Kidd reviews ‘The Formation of the English Kingdom in the Tenth Century’ [and more] · LRB 30 July 2015

    On the history of describing English history, and how “England”, and what makes it English, has changed. (Subscribers only)

  38. Steven Shapin reviews ‘Empire of Tea’ by Markman Ellis, Richard Coulton and Matthew Mauger · LRB 30 July 2015

    Interesting history of tea, and the changes around it over the centuries. “By the 1910s, eight thousand [tea leaf] rolling machines had replaced the hand-labour of 1.5 million workers.” (Subscribers only)

  39. Jackson Lears reviews ‘The Age of Acquiescence’ by Steve Fraser · LRB 16 July 2015

    How left-leaning beliefs have disappeared in the US, mostly over the first half of the 20th century. (Subscribers only)

  40. James Meek · Why are you still here?: Who owns Grimsby? · LRB 23 April 2015

    A long, good piece from Grimsby on its history, its industries and its general election candidates. Lots of things relevant to the rest of the country too of course.

  41. James Meek · The Shock of the Pretty: Seventy Hours with Don Draper · LRB 9 April 2015

    Good on ‘Mad Men’. A bunch of these criticisms are why I’ve failed to make it through the first season twice.

  42. Frances Stonor Saunders · Stuck on the Flypaper: The Hobsbawm File · LRB 9 April 2015

    Fascinating. For the spycraft, the jargon, the very quiet British hysteria over communism, MI5, the weird changing attitudes to the various factions before and after WWII, the BBC. Scarily bonkers.

  43. Adam Shatz reviews ‘Congo’ by David Van Reybrouck · LRB 23 October 2014

    This stopped me… After a long account of decades of central African bloodshed, “the profits from ‘conflict minerals’ peaked [in 2000], fed by increased demand for mobile phones and the release of the Sony PlayStation 2.”David Van Reybrouck

  44. Francis FitzGibbon · Short Cuts · LRB 23 October 2014

    Interesting about exactly how much or little the Human Rights Act, which the Tories want to repeal, constrains the British government.

  45. Owen Hatherley reviews ‘Guide to the Architecture of London’ by Edward Jones and Christopher Woodward · LRB 21 August 2014

    I’m not sure this makes me want to read the book under review, but the review itself is a good read if you’re into London and/or architecture.

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