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Bookmarks tagged with “mapping”

  1. Statistical NLP on OpenStreetMap: Part 2 – Al Barrentine – Medium

    On getting computers to recognise the parts of all formats of street addresses from around the world. Amazing, even/especially the bits I don’t understand.

  2. Surging Seas: Risk Zone Map

    I don’t think I’d seen these sea-level rise maps by Stamen before. Nice. Scary, but nice.

  3. The Deleted City 3.0

    Zoomable map of the GeoCities filesystem. (via FlowingData)

  4. TimeMapper - Make Timelines and TimeMaps fast!

    Make a timeline thing, including maps, using Google Spreadsheets as the data source.

  5. Sheetsee.js

    “A client-side library for connecting Google Spreadsheets to a website and visualizing the information in tables, maps and charts.” Obviously requires JavaScript, but looks like a nice way to create easily-editable data, charts, maps.

  6. Olympic Races, in Your Neighborhood - The New York Times

    Very nicely-done (couldn’t be simpler) thing showing you how long and fast races are from your address. A bit like BERG’s old How Big Really.

  7. Generating fantasy maps

    A nice post on how the imaginary maps for @unchartedatlas are generated using JavaScript.

  8. How to use Land Registry data to explore land ownership near you | Anna’s blog

    Nice clear description of two ways to view basic Land Registry data about an area. A shame it even takes this much work. And the Ordnance Survey stuff is so locked down. And Land Registry data lookups cost £3.

  9. Who’s On First · Mapzen

    On making, basically, a database of places. You don’t need to understand the technical details to get a sense of the huge difficulties in translating these odd human concepts into something more computery. From August 2015. (via @simonw)

  10. The True Size Of …

    Nice way of comparing the size of a country, with it resizing as you drag it North and South. (via @benhammersley)

  11. Private Eye | Official Site - Selling England by the offshore pound

    Map of the UK showing individual freehold and leasehold properties registered by offshore companies between 2005 and July 20014. Great stuff. And nice to see the Eye doing this kind of thing. (via @genmon)

  12. The Jefferson Grid (@the.jefferson.grid) • Instagram photos and videos

    Lovely. Aerial shots of squares of the US as marked out by the Public Land Survey System, originally created in 1785. (via Bldgblog)

  13. Insurance Plan of London Vol. VI: sheet 135 – 1887 – Chas E Goad Limited – Chas E Goad Limited – Visualize

    After a lot of clicking through lists of sheets I found this 1887 map of where we live. So many buildings. Book marblers! Feather warehouse! Umbrella factory! Tranters Temperance Hotel! Nicely done, British Library.

  14. Fire insurance maps and plans

    The dull title, and initial interface, doesn’t do this collection justice. Really, really detailed old maps of towns - lots of London - showing individual buildings and usage, each sheet carefully overlaid onto Google maps. It’s an effort to find a particular area though.

  15. geojson.io

    Draw on a map, or import geo data files, and get the data out in various other formats. Beautifully simple. (via Tom Taylor)

  16. MapTiler - map overlay, cut map tiles for Google Maps, GIS layers and mobile apps – MapTiler

    Hmm, maybe something like this will make it not-a-pain to overlay a historic London map on Google Maps for Pepys’ Diary. If I can find a decent copyright-free one.

  17. Locating London’s Past

    Amazingly good versions of the 1746 Rocque map of London, and the first (1869-80) OS map. All fully tiled, zoomable searchable, etc. The mapping methodology page makes me glad I never tried this. (via @agpublic)

  18. Britain from Above | Rescue the Past

    This is amazing. Prepare to lose some time to looking up places you know. Over 47,000 aerial images of Britain from between 1919 and 1953.

  19. Stamen design | maps.stamen.com is live

    If you’re at all interested or curious about maps and what can be done with them online, this and the following four posts are fascinating and well worth a read. Amazing, generous work.

  20. Maps.stamen.com

    These new Watercolor map tiles from Stamen are amazing and lovely. I am also very impressed with the URLs. I wish Google Maps did that.

  21. Apple Map Tiles

    A viewer for Apple’s new map tiles, as used in iPhoto on iOS. I quite like some of it - a nice change from the norm - but if I could change only one thing… those italicised place names are *hideous*.

  22. Adventures (in code) - Alastair Coote • I had no idea how to make custom maps, so I learnt by doing. You should too.

    Nice overview of how to get custom maps made with TileMill up and running. (via Infovore)

  23. Google Maps Free Alternatives « Fubra

    A nice summary of the alternatives to Google Maps. I don’t do this stuff frequently enough to keep up.

  24. Why (and how) we’ve switched away from Google Maps - Nestoria Blog

    A nice explanation of Nestoria switching from Google Maps to OSM with MapQuest, Leaflet and Mapstraction. Also worth it for the paragraph on Google’s poor salesmanship.

  25. OSM terrain layer (tecznotes)

    Some lovely looking terrain maps, and lots of words I don’t understand. it’s hard to remember what online maps were like only ten years ago, and now the ability to tinker with stuff like this.

  26. Ulmon Offline Maps and Tourist Travel City Maps & Guides

    Meant to link to this a while back. CityMaps2Go was a really nice offline map viewer for iPhone while I was on holiday. Vector-based, so good detail, and no roaming charges.

  27. Henry Beck Rules, not OK? Breaking the Rules of Diagrammatic Map Design (PDF)

    A thoughtful essay by Max Roberts, from 2009, about the rules used in Beck’s diagrammatic London Underground map, and when they’re worth breaking. Well worth a read. (via Blech)

  28. Live Ships Map - AIS - Vessel Traffic and Positions

    Oh, nice. There’s something magical about seeing live data of vehicles around the world, like the plane maps we saw during the ash cloud last year. Especially lovely having ships’ names displayed. (via Preoccupations)

  29. 1UP: The importance of platforms, and how we’re extending ours | Foursquare Blog

    Ooh, nice: Foursquare’s Venue Project, to tie together IDs for different places (businesses, buildings, etc) on different sites and services. (via Booktwo)

  30. d3.js, Javascript library for manipulating data-driven documents

    Looks like a very flexible javascript thing for turning data into different kinds of diagram_ chart_ map_ etc. (via Waxy)

  31. Sohei Nishino - Diorama map London (Detailed info)

    Stunning photographic collage photo-maps of cities. Currently at Michael Hoppen Gallery, SW3 3TD until 2nd April. (via Blech)

  32. File:Wardour St Name Changes since 1585.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I had no idea Wardour Street had been so variable over the years. (via gwire’s Tumblr)

  33. The OS X Spatial Stack :: Drive-by Digressions

    Looks very handy, if my OS X system wasn’t already a complete mess of historic and forgotten installs of various things.

  34. MapCrunch - Random Google Street View

    Really simple idea, everyone’s linking to it, and it’s still very lovely. Instant momentary holiday.

  35. Google LatLong: History in the Unmaking

    Very nice - Google Earth layers of London and Paris in 1945. I also didn’t know Google Earth had lots of different post-2000 layers (for London at least). (via Booktwo)

  36. The Unsorting Office

    Leaving aside the making-my-blood-boil mess of the Royal Mail, that bit at the end about recording all the knowledge of posties about short-cuts, hills, gates, etc is interesting.

  37. London Cycle Hire Explorer

    Tom Taylor’s nice site for exploring data about London’s cycle hire stations - graphs showing their activity over time.

  38. My Large Google Maps tool

    Not pretty, but handy for drawing polylines and shapes on Google Maps and getting the coordinates.

  39. A Vision of Britain through Time | Your national on-line library for local history | Maps, Statistics, Travel Writing and more

    This is interesting. Seems to be a collection of historic texts and maps and data, all searchable by location. Some nicely done stuff.

  40. Connecting Historical Authorities with Links, Contexts and Entities

    “We want to help create an historic placename gazetteer for the UK, publish it as Linked Data and link it to other widely-used sources of placename reference information on the semantic web.”

  41. Gutenkarte » Book Catalog

    “Gutenkarte downloads public domain texts from Project Gutenberg, and then feeds them to MetaCarta’s GeoParser API, which extracts and returns all the geographic locations it can find.” (via BookTwo)

  42. Historypin | Home

    This is rather nice, especially when you finally get to viewing the historical photos in place in Google Streetview. (via Beyond the Beyond)

  43. BLDGBLOG: A Design History of Military Airspace

    “A volumetric rendering of military airspace in East Germany during the 1980s, as imaged in Google Earth.” Mapping historical, invisible, 3D spaces. Must be good.

  44. Live map of London Underground trains

    Lovely quick thing from Matthew Somerville, a map of where tube trains are right now. Moving. Live. Magic.

  45. Woe db

    Searchable index of the Where On Earth ID location database, very nicely done.

  46. Cartographer.js – thematic mapping for Google Maps

    Javascript library for mapping data nicely onto Google Maps. Area-scaled circles, choropleth, etc. (via Simon Willison)

  47. Re: [OpenLayers-Users] Displaying a popup on mouse over AND a different popup on click.

    Code example for having OpenLayers markers that can be hovered over and clicked.

  48. http://openlayers.org/dev/examples/georss-flickr.html

    Another example of clickable images in a vector layer in an OpenLayers map.

  49. Flickr: Contacts Photo Browser

    Example of OpenLayers using clickable images in a vector layer.

  50. Viewing Large Images – OpenLayers, GSIV, ModestMaps, DeepZoom, and Python « Itinerant Source

    Someone looking at different ways to display very large, pannable, zoomable images on the web.

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