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Bookmarks tagged with “politics”

  1. Tom Crewe · What will be left?: Labour’s Prospects · LRB 18 May 2017

    Slightly out of date opinion poll-wise, but I liked this as a summary of where Labour is and how we, as a country, got here.

  2. Accelerationism: how a fringe philosophy predicted the future we live in | World news | The Guardian

    I’m ashamed to say that I was barely aware of much of this. How did that happen then? And until now? (via Buckslip)

  3. David Runciman reviews ‘Theresa May’ by Rosa Prince · LRB 16 March 2017

    I haven’t had much of a sense of what May is about, what makes her tick. This article seems to have an interesting set of ideas about it.

  4. 4chan: The Skeleton Key to the Rise of Trump – Medium

    This was a good read on a segment of Trump’s supporters being like, or actually, 4chan in origin.

  5. The Strange Death of Municipal England (London Review of Books)

    A good read, especially if you’re feeling all full of optimism about a new year and need to be brought crashing back to earth.

  6. Who Will Command The Robot Armies?

    Loads of good stuff in this transcript of Maciej Ceglowski’s latest talk. The section taking the piss out of silly IoT things seems like a trivialising distraction though.

  7. You Are Still Crying Wolf | Slate Star Codex

    Good on keeping some of the Trump stuff in perspective. Yes, he’s terrible but the media tends to focus on certain things out of all proportion to their actual importance or relevance.

  8. The State of the Presidential Debate - The New Yorker

    Interesting history of the debates and how they came to be what they are. (via @antimega)

  9. Inside The Federal Bureau Of Way Too Many Guns | GQ

    How the non-computerised method of finding out who bought a particular gun, from its make and serial number, works in the US. Crazy.

  10. Income and inequality historical data explorer

    Graphing the data for successive UK governments.

  11. YouGov | The leadership effect - how leaders can shift perceptions of parties

    Because I like charts showing the left/right position of parties and politicians over time.

  12. They Could Have Picked… (London Review of Books)

    Eliot Weinberger on all the Republican presidential candidates other than Trump. At this point it’s become easy to forget that they were *all* nutjobs. Still, makes me thankful to live in the UK.

  13. Who Are All These Trump Supporters? - The New Yorker

    A good read by George Saunders. “What unites these stories is what I came to think of as usurpation anxiety syndrome—the feeling that one is, or is about to be, scooped, overrun, or taken advantage of by some Other with questionable intentions.”

  14. I’m With The Banned — Welcome to the Scream Room — Medium

    Laurie Penny. A good read, but depressing. I don’t know what you, we, do when people who believe nothing get all the attention.

  15. Thoughts on the sociology of Brexit - Political Economy Research Centre

    Another good read on understandable reasons why people have voted for Out. (via @tomskitomski)

  16. ‘If you’ve got money, you vote in … if you haven’t got money, you vote out’ | Politics | The Guardian

    A good read for getting beyond “Out voters are all racists!” (via @tomskitomski)

  17. Nigel’s Against the World (London Review of Books)

    I’ve mostly been ignoring EU referendum stuff but this is quite good on the things we don’t really know about what happens if we leave.

  18. America Has Never Been So Ripe for Tyranny — NYMag

    There are loads of worried articles about Trump but this is a nice long overview of worries. (via @spongefile)

  19. Corbyn in the Media - Paul Myerscough (London Review of Books)

    This is good on the Guardian being out of touch, in denial, with all those who voted for Corbyn, and on the “impartiality” of the BBC.

  20. Labour through the looking glass: 15 early-morning speculations on the Corbyn surge | Dougald Hine

    A (hopeful) scenario for what a Jeremy Corbyn victory might look like and how this isn’t a Militant-style surge but a modern network Occupy-style one. (via @paulpod)

  21. Jackson Lears reviews ‘The Age of Acquiescence’ by Steve Fraser · LRB 16 July 2015

    How left-leaning beliefs have disappeared in the US, mostly over the first half of the 20th century. (Subscribers only)

  22. The Early Days of a Better Nation

    Mainly for Régis Debray’s gloomy description of May 1968, written in 1979: “We had to imagine ourselves as Chinese, in order to become Californians.”

  23. HM Government Horizon Scanning Programme - Social Attitudes of Young People

    “The aim of this report is to assess if and how social attitudes of young people in the UK today differ from previous generations, and how they might evolve in the future.” December 2014

  24. Coalition calculator - General Election 2015, FT.com

    Simple and clear. Nice. (via @AftertheFloodco)

  25. James Meek · Why are you still here?: Who owns Grimsby? · LRB 23 April 2015

    A long, good piece from Grimsby on its history, its industries and its general election candidates. Lots of things relevant to the rest of the country too of course.

  26. UK Election Quiz

    I Side With’s quiz came out best in Francis Irving’s roundup. I got 97% Labour, 94% Green. “Your political beliefs would be considered extremely Left-Wing and strongly Authoritarian”.

  27. “I find politics inaccessible”: User testing voter advice apps : Francis Irving

    Francis Irving tests out a load of “Who should I vote for?” websites.

  28. PLOS ONE: The Rise of Partisanship and Super-Cooperators in the U.S. House of Representatives

    For the couple of diagrams showing how the number of congresspeople voting cross-party has changed over time. I love attempts to visualise party political changes over time.

  29. Mr. Miller Doesn’t Go to Washington - Matt Miller - POLITICO Magazine

    “A candidate’s memoir.” Being a candidate sounds like even less fun than I ever thought it would be.

  30. Your Job is Political: Tech Money in Politics

    Whether you agree or not with the activities of the VCs mentioned here, it’s good to be reminded that working for VC-funded startups doesn’t only make the VC richer (if all goes well), but funds whatever they want to spend their money on. Do you know what that is?

  31. Francis FitzGibbon · Short Cuts · LRB 23 October 2014

    Interesting about exactly how much or little the Human Rights Act, which the Tories want to repeal, constrains the British government.

  32. The Case for Reparations - The Atlantic

    This was good. More about the case for having a discussion about the case for reparations. It was more affecting to me than, say, ‘Twelve Years a Slave’, which was too easily put in the “that’s just history” or “one person’s experience” buckets.

  33. Perry Anderson · The Italian Disaster · LRB 22 May 2014

    Not for most of the article, but for the first 7+ paragraphs outlining the, er, legal difficulties, of those in political power across Europe. We are terrible.

  34. Rumsfeld’s War and Its Consequences Now by Mark Danner | The New York Review of Books

    This series of articles on Rumsfeld is a good read. But this, the first article, is the only one that’s available to non-subscribers.

  35. How Britain exported next-generation surveillance — Matter — Medium

    Finally got round to reading James’s piece on Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras. It’s odd to think of this vast network of vision and computation churning away monitoring live and historical movements of people, invisibly.

  36. A nation of slaves

    Charlie Stross on the Conservatives’ target of “full employment”. I hate their (and Labour’s) “hardworking families” rhetoric as if work, any work at all, no matter how it’s achieved or what the alternatives might be, is an end in itself.

  37. Politics doesn’t change anything

    Examples of the many things changed by politics in the UK, as opposed to market-led “disruption”. (via Paul Mison)

  38. Lottie Dexter should quit - and take the Year of Code board with her - Adrian Short

    This all sounds like such a horrible, shallow farce led by people who feel “entrepreneurship” is the sole thing that should be encouraged in children. Fuck that.

  39. Where will we live? by James Meek (LRB)

    Linked to by everyone, for good reason. A good, long piece about the UK’s history of council and social housing, the architecture and planning, and where we are now. As with so many policy areas, I wish one of the main parties wanted to do something bold, different and good.

  40. Planespotting

    James Bridle, spotting and tracking the private coaches and planes that are deporting immigrants in our name. Good, difficult stuff.

  41. WHAT THE FLUCK!

    I know many people roll their eyes at Adam Curtis, but no one writes these wide-ranging stories like he does, illustrated with video. (Even if I can’t watch the video because it’s Flash.)

  42. Anatomy of a failed rendition

    James, better than ever, digging into the network to track the plane, hired by the Home Office, that failed to deport a hunger striker, too weak to see or stand, from the UK. “…climbing and banking to avoid thunderheads and moral accountability.”

  43. Geeks for Monarchy: The Rise of the Neoreactionaries | TechCrunch

    The sort of logical endpoint for the worst of Silicon Valley geekdom. (via @GreatDismal)

  44. Arresting the Unjustly Homeless while they Learn to Code — Weird Future — Medium

    Good stuff, on that well-intentioned but myopic vanity project to help a homeless man to code. Hey, why not use your energy to change the system? Even less chance of success and glory, but if enough of you do it you might just make a sodding difference you. Gah, angry.

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