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Bookmarks tagged with “uk”

  1. Success by Benjamin Markovits (London Review of Books)

    I’m not into sport but love articles like this, which ponders why England/GB has been successful in recent years at some sports. Business, statistics, culture, etc.

  2. Sold Out by Stefan Collini (London Review of Books)

    On how the UK’s universities have changed over recent decades, becoming bigger, more beholden to private interests, more expensive for students… the LRB’s best current affairs articles are all so depressing.

  3. Planespotting

    James Bridle, spotting and tracking the private coaches and planes that are deporting immigrants in our name. Good, difficult stuff.

  4. WHAT THE FLUCK!

    I know many people roll their eyes at Adam Curtis, but no one writes these wide-ranging stories like he does, illustrated with video. (Even if I can’t watch the video because it’s Flash.)

  5. Anatomy of a failed rendition

    James, better than ever, digging into the network to track the plane, hired by the Home Office, that failed to deport a hunger striker, too weak to see or stand, from the UK. “…climbing and banking to avoid thunderheads and moral accountability.”

  6. Financial calculators and tools collected

    All the financial calculators, mostly UK-oriented, you could need.

  7. They may have the money, but we have the tools of technology.

    James Darling. I’ll be upfront about this: I find any, “We’re doing amazing worthwhile things at the government, doing Good, and it’s your duty to join us,” rhetoric really, really annoying. But this is still good stuff. And *such* an antidote if you’ve read one too many Silicon Valley boosterism posts on Medium.

  8. Ian Penman reviews ‘Mod’ by Richard Weight · LRB 29 August 2013

    This is packed with good stuff. The differences between the fans of trad and modern jazz. Mods as continental modernists, aesthetes. Mods compared to other subcultures. “Tellyology”: shaping history with both eyes on a potential TV series. Ray Davies. Miles Davis. Blur. Noel Gallagaher. Today’s Mod revival as a ploddy “dad rock” conservatism. The British Music Experience.

  9. London’s Great Exodus

    Seen lots of links to this today. Rather depressing, if you want London to be somewhere you and your friends can afford to live. “The city is essentially a tax haven with great theater, free museums and formidable dining.”

  10. Britain from Above | Rescue the Past

    This is amazing. Prepare to lose some time to looking up places you know. Over 47,000 aerial images of Britain from between 1919 and 1953.

  11. John Lanchester · Are we having fun yet?: The Biggest Scandal of All · LRB 4 July 2013

    This and the second part are so worth a read. Banks are mind-boggling.

  12. What’s the difference between r/creepshots and a national newspaper?

    I’ve become worryingly inured that the Mail, Sun etc are full of scantily clad young women, but why the Telegraph thinks this is news is beyond me. I’d say “the sooner the hypocritical newspapers die the better” but given, for example, the Mail’s online success, that won’t stop this.

  13. East Anglian Film Archive: Basildon - Our Town, 1974

    Short documentary about the Essex Town. Lots of council-provided facilities. Things that now look a bit small, grey and grim. A lot of standardised typefaces. Great stuff. (via @mala)

  14. 9 lazy portfolios for UK investors

    It’s annoyingly rare to come across UK-specific guidelines for portfolios, so this up-to-date set of examples is handy.

  15. 10 questions about Cameron’s ‘new’ porn-blocking | Paul Bernal’s Blog

    All this. Censoring illegal content is one thing, assuming it can be done, but anything else is a slippery slope into a whole can of mixed metaphors.

  16. RSS commission new research into public perceptions of statistics | RSSeNews

    The British public thinks it lives in Daily Mail fantasy horror world. (via @wonderlandblog)

  17. WowHaus

    A blog of modernist etc houses for sale in the UK (see also ‘Modernist Estates’ for the apartment equivalent).

  18. The Way They Live Now by Michael Lewis | The New York Review of Books

    A good review by Michael Lewis of John Lanchester’s ‘Capital’. I’ve realised there’s, often something extra enjoyable in reviews of very British books by Americans, and vice versa.

  19. Modernist Estates

    A blog collecting modernist homes in the UK that are for sale. Nice stuff.

  20. Welcome to Toytown: what life is like in new-build Britain | Society | The Guardian

    ‘“It’s referred to as a village, but it’s an estate,” Terri insists. “The fact that it was all built at the same time means it’s an estate. Villages evolve, don’t they?”’

  21. Huhne and Pryce went to jail despite their privilege, not because of it

    Yes, all this. All the “oh, they don’t deserve it, jail will be so hard for them,” talk makes me so angry given the ludicrous sentences given for some other things that we must apparently be “robust” and “firm” in dealing with. (via @matlock)

  22. Digital Pianos - Which Brand Should I Buy

    Every few years I have a browse, and there’s so little comprehensive information around online. This site is a bit of a sprawling mess but has tons of stuff on it. It sounds nicely honest for a shop. [UPDATE: The owner also owns the Classenti brand, the brand of pianos he favours here… not so honest after all.]

  23. New Residential Tower For City Road Approved

    Blimey, that’s huge! The current half-built towers (on the left) already look oppressively tall for this spot.

  24. Scarfolk Council

    “Scarfolk is a town in North West England that did not progress beyond 1979.” Very nicely done tone and artefacts. Hauntology as fictional blog kind of thing. (via @harikunzru)

  25. ‘Not believing in God makes life more precious’: meet the atheist ‘churchgoers’ | World news | The Guardian

    A few years ago I was wondering what an atheist Sunday “service” would be like. here we are.

  26. The stupid cookie law is dead at last | Silktide blog

    “History has shown us that whenever a law opposes the will of the people, it doesn’t tend to do much. It may have been illegal to tape songs off the radio, but there’s little appetite from police officers to cart schoolchildren off to prison for it. And so it is here.” (via @tomskitomski)

  27. The Last Places

    Henry VIII’s wine cellar, once part of Whitehall Palace, still exists under the Ministry of Defence. Although the entire cellar was moved, in one piece, when the MoD was being built. (via ?)

  28. Short Cuts (London Review of Books)

    Paul Myerscough on Pret a Manger. 91% of employees are immigrants. Social security as a subsidy to companies whose products would otherwise be too expensive for their non-social-security-receiving customers.

  29. Let’s Call it Failure (London Review of Books)

    John Lanchester on good, if depressing, form on the state of the UK economy and “austerity”.

  30. Barbican, 1969 - YouTube

    Documentary about the Barbican, including footage of the then nearly-completed buildings, and (at 15:40) a look inside one of the show flats.

  31. London Centre for Book Arts

    New, in Hackney, devoted to artists’ books. They do classes on printing, binding, etc. (via the Guardian)

  32. Makeshift // Catalogue // Pylons of Great Britain

    Paricularly for the spotter’s guide image of different pylon designs, and the construction diagrams. (via notes.husk.org)

  33. Ethical Funds - Ethical Fund Directory, Ethical Investment, Ethical Financial Advice

    Another list of UK ethical funds, rated by someone else’s criteria.

  34. Ethical investment: failing to keep up? | FairPensions

    A recent survey of ethical fund providers in the UK. (I’m scrabbling for anything to go on, because you’d have to spend weeks researching this stuff to actually have a real clue.)

  35. If I May Speak Procedurally, Sir: Building The British Countryside Generator | BIG ROBOT

    Lovely to read something like this about the British countryside rather than, say, futuristic cityscapes.

  36. I, Anna Trailer - YouTube

    Charlotte Rampling and Gabriel Byrne in a movie that seems largely set in the Barbican. Includes a scene in a lift with the blue “lift curtains” that are hung when someone’s moving in or out, to protect the lift. A nice cosy/claustrophobic touch.

  37. James Meek · How We Happened to Sell Off Our Electricity · LRB 13 September 2012

    Plenty of people linked to this at the time, but I forgot. Now I am. A good read on who now owns the UK’s power.

  38. Boris Johnson: brilliant, warm, funny – and totally unfit to be PM | Max Hastings | Comment is free | The Guardian

    I did like Hastings’ article on Johnson. Although it doesn’t exactly hold out hope for there being any better politicians either.

  39. Salary survey 2012

    A survey of “creative and marketing professionals” - basically all the roles in agencies, as far as I can tell. Both permanent and freelance.

  40. Not just shit but dangerous « Chris T-T

    This is angry but, yes, unfortunately I agree with pretty much of all of it. We should look at the closing ceremony as epitomising what the opening ceremony, and the brilliant subsequent two weeks, were encouraging us to move away from. (via @blaine)

  41. Is any of us fit to pick up the Olympic baton? | Snowblog

    “I am not alone in detecting a yearning to turn the extraordinary Olympic achievement into an engine for pulling together to deliver Olympic scale achievements with and for the wider Team GB, ourselves no less.” Easier said than done but, yes, this. (via @matlock)

  42. Warren Ellis » Closing

    On the Olympic closing ceremony. Exactly right.

  43. Underworld’s brief to ‘frighten people’ at the London 2012 opening ceremony | Music | The Guardian

    “The contrast between this summer’s two uber-spectaculars – the diamond jubilee concert and the Olympics opening ceremony – couldn’t be starker.” Yes, it felt like we’ve moved on from big events requiring 1980s musicians. (via Blech)

  44. London 2012: Danny Boyle’s story of Britain was a celebration of freedom | Shami Chakrabarti | Comment is free | The Guardian

    “Humility”, “democratic”, “optimistic”. Words Shami Chakrabsti uses in association with Danny Boyle, which also help explain the appeal of the Ceremony itself. (via Alex Balfour)

  45. Collective Joy « LRB blog

    Also on the opening ceremony: “It was love as sentiment, a nostalgic cry for what has been lost. And it is lost. There is no party of the left with a different attitude towards the economy, privatisation and cuts in benefits and the NHS.”

  46. Britain: this is for everyone - newsmary

    On the Olympic opening ceremony: “The opening, pastoral and construction scenes showed clear class delineations; the joyous riot of music and popular culture that grew from it showed disparate, distinct but equal individuals. There’s a vision of utopia there, and it is neither homogenous nor segregated.” (via Blech)

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